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. the middle east editor is in damascus and sent this report on the battle for an increasingly divided city. >> damascus is at the heart of the bloodiest arab uprising. they keep them under tight security that squeezes traffic down the main road. the capitals still functions. but the battle for damascus is under way. it is happening in the suburbs after months of shelling and air strikes. it is controlled by the rebels the claim they own about one- third of greater damascus. the rebels only have pockets of ground. these were blocks of flats. all sides should distinguish between civilians hiding. almost every building is damaged, which suggests is being treated as a military target. >> they sought a bomb and a barrel of explosives dropped from the helicopter. the blitz is breaking the city and breaking lives. it isn't breaking with the president's enemies. >> they have shown that they have the stomach for a fight. they can endure pain and they have the conviction that if they don't, they will be killed. the question for them is what more they will have to do. the fighters showed off what the
out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resol
, marginal towns. and then it came to the cities. we went back to this into account -- to a town, poor and neglected. we found a festering frustrations of young and old. they say nothing has changed. they did say, we got freedom of expression. we heard the same thing in the capital. but they expected more. even though anger boils over on the streets, most say they were willing to wait as long as they saw evidence the country was moving in the right direction. >> what are the chances that the new government can fulfill that demand for jobs amongst its young people? >> it is going to take a long time. look at the problems in europe and america. it is all about jobs. that is when it comes down to. these are countries who have lived with decades of authoritarian rule. in tunisia, 75% of its exports go through europe. there is also a physical problem. you need a leadership concentrating on the right issues. there is a criticism here. in tunis, the leaders are too bogged down in political battles. the role of religion in the street -- state. two years of feels like a long time if you are wai
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